Tagarchief: NetworkManager

Setting up a PPTP VPN to a Windows 2008 Server

Requirements

Linux
KDE
A Windows server to connect to.

Step 1: Install required software

yum install kde-plasma-networkmanagement-pptp NetworkManager-pptp

Step 2: Configure the network

In the KDE Network Manager plasma module, go to the tab VPN, click add and choose PPTP.

Enter and connection name you like. In the field "gateway" type the hostname or IP number of the Windows server you're connecting to. Under Login, Password and NT Domain, fill in your authentication data. Then click advanced.

In the advanced window, disable EAP and enable MPPE. Then click OK.

Go to the tab IPv4. Under method, I chose Automatic (VPN). But Automatic (VPN) addresses only is also a nice option: it sets the IPs but no DNS settings.

Go to the routes sub-tab. Switch on Ignore automatically obtained routes and Use only for resources on this connection to make sure the connection doesn't steal your traffic. Then I entered a manual route: 192.168.178.0/255.255.255.0 to gateway 0.0.0.0 (it is a ppp device after all).

You may want to configure IPv6 as well, but I don't at this moment, so I'm not documenting this.

Step 3: Connect

Click on the icon in the tray and connect.

Ubuntu/Debian

I'm running RedHat-based software on all of my machines. Above information may be useful for Ubuntu/Debian users, but it's not tested and I'm not supporting it.

Servers: RedHat Enterprise Linux/CentOS is more suitable for servers, as there's a lot of professional level support available. I think that's important, because if I say, get a car accident, I want the servers to be managable by another professional.

Desktops/Laptops: RPM packages are pretty exchangable between RedHat-based platforms. That's a good reason to run Fedora on the desktop.
© GeekLabInfo Setting up a PPTP VPN to a Windows 2008 Server is a post from GeekLab.info. You are free to copy materials from GeekLab.info, but you are required to link back to http://www.geeklab.info
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DNS and multiple VPNs: Using dnsmasq to access multiple dns suffixes

On my Fedora 15 laptop, I'm almost always connected to several VPNs simultaneously. One VPN to my office or to my home (depending on where I am), one to the data center, one to a customer. These connections all have their own DNS server with their own suffix.

To make all dns suffixes working, I created a script that redirects all outgoing DNS traffic to dnsmasq running on localhost, which in turn forwards all requests for .lan to 192.168.15.254 and all requests for .gl to 192.168.1.254.

The script was put in /etc/NetworkManager/dispatcher.d/10-DNS:

if [ -e /var/run/dnsmasq.localhost ]; then
        cat /proc/`cat /var/run/dnsmasq.localhost`/cmdline |grep dnsmasq >/dev/null 2>/dev/null && \
        kill `cat /var/run/dnsmasq.localhost`
fi
 
if [ "$2" == "up" ]; then
        cp /etc/resolv.conf /etc/resolv.conf.dhcp
        echo nameserver 127.0.0.1 >  /etc/resolv.conf
        echo domain $DHCP4_DOMAIN_NAME >> /etc/resolv.conf 
        echo search $DHCP4_DOMAIN_NAME >> /etc/resolv.conf 
        /usr/sbin/dnsmasq -C /dev/null -r /etc/resolv.conf.dhcp --server=/gl/192.168.1.254 \
            --server=/lan/192.168.15.254 --bind-interfaces --listen-address 127.0.0.1 \ 
            --pid-file=/var/run/dnsmasq.localhost
fi

Once I had to fix resolv.conf manually when I connected my laptop to my Samsung Galaxy SII as well. This may mean I need to improve the script some day, but for the time being, it works good enough.

© GeekLabInfo DNS and multiple VPNs: Using dnsmasq to access multiple dns suffixes is a post from GeekLab.info. You are free to copy materials from GeekLab.info, but you are required to link back to http://www.geeklab.info
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